Rivi Litvin - Bile Duct Cancer

Bile Duct Cancer: Beating A Cancer That Can’t Be Beaten

Bile Duct Cancer:  Beating A Cancer That Can’t Be Beaten

In November of 2012 Rivi had the shock of her life: her urine turned orange.

Thinking that it was something that she’d eaten, she went on about her day. But soon it became apparent that it was not that at all. With severe stomach pains still ongoing after nearly 2 ½ weeks she finally went to the doctor to find out what was going on. The physician’s assistant told her that more than likely it was a gallbladder problem and sent Rivi to the county hospital.

She did not want to go and instead went to Cedars Sinai where they found cancer in her bile duct. They immediately scheduled her for surgery four days later. Though a difficult surgery, lasting nearly 10 ½ hours, it seemed as if it were a success.

 

The Surgery

“They took out a lot of things from me,” Rivi shares. “They had to remove my bile duct, gallbladder, part of my liver, pancreas and portions of my intestines. They replumbed everything. I managed to survive all of that and didn’t have any complications.”

They took out a lot of things from me … my bile duct, gallbladder, part of my liver, pancreas and portions of my intestines … “

Not Over Yet – Chemotherapy and Radiation

But there was a catch. The doctors now recommended chemotherapy and radiation. When she refused they were very upset with her.

“However, after 4 months I knew that they hadn’t gotten it all because when I went back they found cancer in my spleen and liver. I was put immediately into chemo and radiation.”

 

What is Cholangiocarcinoma?

The form of cancer that Rivi had, cholangiocarcinoma (or, more pronounceably, bile duct cancer), is one that originates in the tissues of the bile duct. The bile duct is a very small tube that connects the liver and the gallbladder to the small intestine.  Cancer can occur in any part of the bile duct.  Commonly, the part of the tube that connects to the liver is where most of this type of cancer arises. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type of bile duct cancer. This is a cancer that takes hold in the mucus glands that line the inside of the bile duct.

In comparison to other cancers, Cholangiocarcinoma is fairly rare, but it can be deadly.  Only 2500 new cases are reported each year in the US, alone. Comparatively, it can be seen that the occurrence of this type of cancer is on the upswing, making earlier diagnosis much more significant.

According to national statistics, only 30% of those diagnosed with localized bile duct cancer survive for 5 years or more, while only 2% of those with metastatic disease make it to the 5 year mark.

 

Turning to Natural Treatments and Hope4Cancer

During the four months that Rivi had of good health, she’d been researching and educating herself about her cancer. Even the physicians at the hospital encouraged her to seek additional treatments as they had realized that they had done all that they could for her.

She was committed to finding a place that would meet her needs and did not care if she had to go outside of the US to do so. She looked at several clinics, including one in Germany.

When I spoke with Dr. Jimenez … I was struck by how thorough he was and I was most impressed with how many different therapies he offered.  I learned that he is a frequent speaker at many medical conventions for the pioneering work that he is doing in his clinic.”

As a researcher, Rivi was looking for a clinic that would not only provide a good number of therapies, but also offered explanations and could back up their claims with solid research. Three clinics in Mexico seemed to fit that description, so she determined to speak to all of them to get a ‘feel’ for how they operated.

“When I spoke to Dr. Jimenez (and we spoke for well over an hour) I was struck by how thorough he was and I was most impressed with how many different therapies he offered. He offered many more than the others and he is well known for his research. I learned that he is a frequent speaker at many medical conventions for the pioneering work that he is doing in his clinic.”  She also learned that when she admitted she would have a full examination that would also include dental exams.

When she spoke with the other clinics that she had been considering, she was shocked that both of them suggested that she undergo chemotherapy in conjunction with her alternative treatments.  That was the deciding factor for her as she was adamantly against any more chemo.

“I only wish that I knew this information before my earlier rounds of chemo,” she says regretfully. “The chemicals they pump into you are corrosive. People should consider doing anything else before they do that.”

During her recent stay at Hope4Cancer Treatment Centers, Rivi made substantial progress.  Under the influence of Sono-Photo Dynamic Therapy, the blood flow to her liver tumor decreased by 40%.   She is now back home looking forward to continued good results!

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