Even in a healthy human body, bacterial cells outnumber our actual cells. The average healthy human body contains 30 trillion human cells and 40 trillion bacteria! Our symbiosis with microbes of all kinds (bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoans, etc.) is beneficial and necessary for our survival. Our healthy immune system ensures that pathogenic microbial populations are kept down to a minimum.

However, when our biological terrain is out of balance, our weakened immune system cannot cope with the growth of pathogenic populations and even innocuous infections can become major threats. Conventional therapies add a serious layer of vulnerability to pathogens by weakening the immune system. For example, many chemotherapies and radiation cause neutropenia, which affects the body’s ability to deal with bacterial and other secondary infections.

Pathogens thrive in environments similar to those conducive to tumor growth and can either trigger malignancies, or create localized environments that provide safe haven to and accelerate tumor growth. In advanced cases of cancer, it is not unusual to see widespread infections. Patients can pick up a variety of opportunistic pathogens from the environment and person-to-person contact. Often dormant, pre-existing infections can now thrive in an immune-suppressed body. Infections can occur with gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria; viruses such as Epstein-Barr, herpes, and cytomegalovirus; and fungi such as candida and aspergillus.

Treating patients for pathogens is an imperative process that requires addressing both the infection as well as the underlying biological terrain. Every case is different. For this reason, we personalize each patient’s treatment with antimicrobial herbs and prescription medication as needed, with the purpose of eradicating infections, while using other methods to rebuild the body’s defense mechanisms.

Antimicrobial Therapy