AARSOTA (Autologous Antigen Receptor Specific Oncogenic Target Acquisition) Bioimmunotherapy is a method of boosting the immune system’s natural cancer-fighting abilities by using a tumor’s own antigens against them.

Tumor antigens are proteins produced in tumor cells that are characteristic of the tumors. The presence of these antigens in blood or urine allows them to be used as tumor markers, identifying the type and tracking the progress of cancer in a host body. For example, CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 are indicative of breast cancer, CA 125 of ovarian cancer, and CA 19-9 of gastrointestinal or pancreatic cancers.

In AARSOTA Bioimmunotherapy, these antigens are used to trigger an immune response to their original source: the cancer cells. Since the antigens are extracted from the patient, the antigen-antibody response is expected to be highly specific to the patient’s tumor.

By extracting the antigenic proteins produced by cancer cells from the patient’s urine, a therapeutic vaccine tailored to the specific tumor in a patient’s body can be created, resulting in a wider, more effective immune response against the cancer. The antigen concentrate is delivered back into the patient via an intramuscular injection at discrete intervals to build up the antigen-antibody response.

Since AARSOTA is made from the body fluids of the patient, the success of the therapy is dependent on the quantity of antigens released in the body fluid. The biggest advantage of this method is that the antigens are naturally specific to the patient’s cancer type. Its biggest drawback is that it is not yet possible to predict if the antigenic concentrate is sufficient to elicit a relevant immune response in each individual patient.

That is partly why we combine AARSOTA with other cancer-fighting treatments such as Sono-Photo Dynamic Therapy and Hyperthermia, as well as a variety of immune-enhancing therapies and supplements. We also recommend that patients repeat the AARSOTA protocol every 2-3 months to maximize the benefits and account for any genetic evolution of the tumor.